The four historic markers will read as follows:

Old Bryce Cemetery

This is the oldest of four historic cemeteries located on the
campus of Bryce Hospital, Alabama’s oldest mental health
facility. The first recorded burial dates to 1861. While only
a few graves are currently marked, it is estimated that
thousands of individuals are buried here. Bryce Hospital is
one of the most historic and architecturally significant public
institutions in the U.S. Established in 1852 at the height of
the psychiatric reform movement known as “moral treatment,”
the hospital was among the first mental health facilities in
the country to employ architectural design and a pastoral
setting as essential components in the treatment of mental
illness. Through Wyatt v. Stickney, the landmark federal
lawsuit initiated in 1971, Bryce Hospital became the
center of the civil rights movement for people who
experience mental illness.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register
Marker erected in 2009 by the Bryce Hospital Historic Preservation Committee,
Alabama Department of Mental Health

Bryce Hospital Cemetery #1A

One of four historic cemeteries located on the campus of Bryce
Hospital, Alabama’s oldest mental health facility, this
cemetery features at least thirty-seven marked graves, the
earliest of which dates to 1892. There are an undetermined
number of unmarked burials. It is speculated that these
burials were originally part of Old Bryce Cemetery, located
north of here, but were moved during the construction of River
Road in the 1960s. Bryce Hospital is one of the most historic
and architecturally significant public institutions in the U.S.
Established in 1852 at the height of the psychiatric reform
movement known as “moral treatment,” the hospital was among
the first mental health facilities in the country to employ
architectural design and a pastoral setting as essential
components in the treatment of mental illness. Through
Wyatt v. Stickney, the landmark federal lawsuit initiated in
1971, Bryce Hospital became the center of the civil rights
movement for people who experience mental illness.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register
Marker erected in 2009 by Families of NAMI Alabama
National Alliance on Mental Illness

Bryce Hospital Cemetery #2

One of four historic cemeteries located on the campus of Bryce
Hospital, Alabama’s oldest mental health facility, this cemetery
was established in 1922 and was closed for burials in 1953.
It contains approximately 1550 burials mostly marked with
simple, chronologically numbered concrete grave markers that
correspond to cemetery ledger books in the possession of the
Alabama Department of Mental Health. Bryce Hospital is one of
the most historic and architecturally significant public
institutions in the U.S. Established in 1852 at the height of
the psychiatric reform movement known as “moral treatment,”
the hospital was among the first mental health facilities in the
country to employ architectural design and a pastoral setting
as essential components in the treatment of mental illness.
Through Wyatt v. Stickney, the landmark federal lawsuit
initiated in1971, Bryce Hospital became the center of the
civil rights movement for people who experience mental illness.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register
Marker erected in 2009 by descendants of Drs. W.D. and R.C. Partlow

Bryce Hospital Cemetery #3

One of four historic cemeteries located on the campus of Bryce
Hospital, Alabama’s oldest mental health facility, this cemetery
was established in 1953 and is still in use. It contains
approximately 500 burials mostly marked with simple,
chronologically numbered concrete grave markers that correspond
to cemetery ledger books in the possession of the Alabama
Department of Mental Health. Bryce Hospital is one of the
most historic and architecturally significant public
institutions in the U.S. Established in 1852 at the height of
the psychiatric reform movement known as “moral treatment,”
the hospital was among the first mental health facilities in the
country to employ architectural design and a pastoral setting
as essential components in the treatment of mental illness.
Through Wyatt v. Stickney, the landmark federal lawsuit
initiated in1971, Bryce Hospital became the center of the
civil rights movement for people who experience mental illness.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register
Marker erected in 2009 by the Bryce Hospital Historic Preservation Committee,
Alabama Department of Mental Health